Search Books

Osteoclastoma - giant cell tumor

Osteoclastoma - giant cell tumor

Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is a rare, aggressive non-cancerous (benign) tumor. It generally occurs in adults between the ages of 20 and 40 years. Giant cell tumor of bone is very rarely seen in children or in adults older than 65 years of age. Giant cell tumors occur in approximately one person per million per year.

Giant cell tumors are named for the way they look under the microscope. Many "giant cells" are seen. They are formed by fusion of several individual cells into a single, larger complex.

Many bone tumors and other conditions (including normal bone) contain giant cells. Giant cell tumor of bone is given its characteristic appearance by the constant finding of a large number of these cells existing in a typical background. Most bone tumors occur in the flared portion near the ends of long bone (metaphysis), but giant cell tumor of bone occurs almost exclusively in the end portion of long bones next to the joints (epiphysis). In rare cases, this tumor may spread to the lungs.

Giant cell tumors of bone occur spontaneously. They are not known to be associated with trauma, environmental factors, or diet. They are not inherited. In rare cases, they may be associated with hyperparathyroidism.

Below you can find symptoms and treatments for Osteoclastoma/GCT